Music

Bossa Nova, anyone? 5 forgotten music styles of the world

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From the ’60s chamber/Baroque to ’80s New Wave/dance pop, music has evolved over time in various types, forms, and styles. These styles boast of rich history and geographical significance.

However, many music styles, which were once popular, have gone through a slow death or have been forgotten at most places of the world.

So, let’s look at five forgotten styles of the world, which are worth enough to be dusted off and revived:

Disco

You might wonder why disco is in the forgotten list when it’s still in use! Here, we are talking about vintage disco, which was organic and completely fun to listen to. The Disco of the 1970s did not require its audience to gulp down gallons of liquor to dance to its tunes. What we hear today is as a mass-market force and a progression of increasingly gruff and not-so-soothing dance styles.

Many music lovers believe that disco has eventually stooped into something quite unintelligent, bleak, and worst of all formulaic.

 

Bossa Nova

Vintage bossa nova was one of the popular music styles during the 1950s – 1960s. People found it cool and sophisticated.

Bossa nova added more hip to Frank Sinatra’s evergreen style, which was thought to be scientifically impossible by a NASA study. One of the fathers of bossa nova, Antônio Carlos Jobim, has left a treasure for the younger musicians out there to grow and enhance the genre’s pop culture status to something better.

 

Skiffle

Skiffle had been popular mostly in the US in the 1920s – 1940s and that in the UK in the 1950s. This music style is indeed fun to listen to. Unfortunately, the music fell out of style in America by the 1950s. In the same year, it exploded in the U.K.

The British skiffle renaissance and its stars — Lonnie Donegan chief among them — contributed to the popularity of the music. The Quarrymen, co-founded by John Lennon was the most famous skiffle group back then.

Legends such as Jimmy Page, Eric Clapton, Van Morrison, David Gilmour, and Graham Nash were highly influenced by this style.

 

Handbag House

Diva house or handbag house was at its peak during the second half of the 1990s.  It is a subgenre of house music and was popular mostly in gay clubs.

The term ‘handbag house’ was used in a pejorative sense in the UK. It indicated the type of music that was snobbishly linked (by the self-proclaimed dance music connoisseurs at any rate) with women. It referred to especially working-class party girls, the name in question referring snidely to the practice of women dancing and enjoying protectively around their handbags.

The style became less relevant as hardcore. It was then that minimalism came to the fore in the late 90s and early 00s. Hardbag style came into existence as a fusion of hardcore and handbag.

 

Outlaw Country

Popular during the 1960s – 1970s, the craze of the music has reduced to a great extent in several countries. An offspring of earlier subgenres like honky-tonk and rockabilly, Outlaw country blends rock and folk rhythms, country instrumentation and introspective lyrics. These days a tidal wave of bland country pop seems to have taken control.

If you want to experience “real” country sounds listen to classics of the ’70s. You will find that the traditional country sound with a blend of rock and roll spirit is still soothing to your ears and heart.

Music is an integral part of our lives. It is indeed the food for love and there can never be an excess of it. And a lot of effort is involved in its making. Let’s hope that someday these genres get to see the light of the day once again.

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